Skipton Canal Boat Rental

Leeds to Liverpool canal holidays

Sponsored by stayuk123.co.uk

57 Foot cruisers 35 hp TV / DVD Sitting room & Bedroom Full self catering facilities

Pet Friendly

Sleeping up to 5 people Includes all bedding & Towels

Full Central Heating

Multi fuel Stove

BBQ Garden Furniture, Life Jackets, Parking

Fully fitted

Kitchen

Shower, WC,

Wash Basin

Full Instruction, Tuition, Insurance 24 Hour Call out, Maps, Welcome pack

A most personal Narrow Boat without company sign writing or logos

Offering a easy going relaxing cruising holiday...on the beautiful Leeds Liverpool & Calder Valley Canals from Barnoldswick and Skipton to Leeds, Halifax & Hebden Bridge

Eleanor Rose is a New 57 foot Luxury Cruiser with all modern facilities ranging from a fully fitted kitchen, Bathroom, Wood Burning Stove and full central heating to Flat Screen TV / DVD's in the living area and bedroom.

Eleanor Rose can take you East from the Pennine Way village of Gargrave near Skipton through the heart of Picturesque Yorkshire Dales Villages such as Skipton, Kildwick and Bradley. To Historic West Yorkshire Towns like Silsden, Keighley, Bingley and Saltaire as far as Leeds. This route enjoys the amazing Bingley Aqueduct and World Famous Bingley 5 rise Locks to name but a few.

To the West Eleanor Rose offers you a cruise traversing spectacular Pennine scenery to the Summit of the Leeds Liverpool Canal on the road to a feast of culture and History dating back centuries through Historic East Lancashire towns such as Barnoldswick, Nelson and Blackburn to the Junction town of Wigan where you can choose the Cultural Cities of Liverpool or Manchester.

The Canal & it's History
Availability & Hire Charges
Canal Cruise Planner
Your Boat Accommodation
The Guest Book
Easy Narrow Boat Operation
Travel Directions / Options
How to Operate the Locks
Wildlife, Fishing & Walking
Back to the Home Page

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The Leeds and Liverpool Canal

Said to be the longest single canal in England, the Historic Leeds and Liverpool Canal links the cities of Leeds and Liverpool. At a distance of 127miles (204km), it's most major engineering achievement was crossing the Pennines with a summit level rising to 487feet (148m). Included in these Historic 127 are 91 locks on the main line. The Canal also has several small branches and in the early 21st century a new link was constructed into the Liverpool docks system.

From Liverpool to Appley Locks, the canal runs for 27miles (43km) without locks, across the West Lancashire Coastal Plain. The two main side-branches both connect to other waterways. The Rufford Branch links into the River Douglas and, via the Ribble Link and the River Ribble to the previously isolated Lancaster Canal. The Leigh Branch from Wigan leads to the Bridgewater Canal and thus to Manchester and the Midlands.

The Leeds Liverpool Canal includes the southern part of the Lancaster Canal between Johnsons Hillock and Wigan Top Lock. A famous part of the canal is at Aintree where it passes close to the racecourse and gives the name to the course's Canal Turn. It has one of the country's most photographed canal features - the Bingley Five Rise Locks at Bingley. Bingley Five Rise and the Burnley Embankment are two of the original Seven Wonders of the canal world chosen by Robert Aikman.

The Canal & it's History
Availability & Hire Charges
Canal Cruise Planner
Your Boat Accommodation
The Guest Book
Easy Narrow Boat Operation
Travel Directions / Options
How to Operate the Locks
Wildlife, Fishing & Walking
Back to the Home Page

History of the Leeds Liverpool Canal

Back in the mid 18th century the growing industrial towns of Yorkshire including Leeds, Wakefield and Bradford, were trading increasingly. While the Aire and Calder Navigation improved links to the east for Leeds, links to the west were limited and the Bradford merchants wanted to increase the supply of limestone to their coal mines and to export their textiles to the port of Liverpool. On the west coast, traders in the busy port of Liverpool wanted a cheap supply of coal for their shipping and manufacturing businesses and to tap the output from the industrial regions of Lancashire.

Inspired by the effectiveness of the wholly-artificial navigation, the Bridgewater Canal opened in 1759-1760. A canal across the Pennines linking Liverpool and Hull (by means of the Aire and Calder Navigation) would have obvious trade benefits. As a result of a public meeting in Bradford on 2 July 1766 John Longbotham was engaged to survey a route. Two groups were set up to promote the scheme, one in Liverpool and one in Bradford.

The final decision ruled in favour of a more northerly route, though with a branch towards Wigan. By 1774 the canal had been completed from Skipton to Shipley, including significant engineering features such as the Bingley Five Rise Locks, Bingley Three Rise Locks and the seven-arch aqueduct over the River Aire. Also completed was the now closed branch to Bradford. On the western side, the section from Liverpool to Newburgh was dug. By the following year the Yorkshire end had been extended to Gargrave, and by 1777 the canal had joined the present day Aire and Calder Navigation in Leeds and on the western side it reached Wigan by 1781, replacing the earlier and unsatisfactory Douglas Navigation.

In 1796 Foulridge Tunnel was opened at 1,640yards (1,500m) long. The new route took the canal south via Burnley and Blackburn, but the latter was not reached until 1810 and the main line of the canal was finally completed in 1816 almost 40 years later.

The most important cargo was always coal, with over a million tons/year being delivered to Liverpool in the 1860s. Even in Yorkshire, more coal was carried than limestone. Once the canal was fully open, receipts for carrying merchandise matched those of coal. The heavy industry along its route, together with the decision to build the canal with broad locks, ensured that (unlike the other two trans-Pennine canals) the Leeds and Liverpool competed successfully with the railways throughout the 19th century and remained open through the 20th century.

The canal suffered some damage during World War II. It was breached by a German mine in Bootle and the headquarters at Pall Mall were damaged. The canal in west Lancashire was even part of Britain's defensive plans against invasion. Along the canal there were tank traps, bunkers and blockhouses. Some buildings such as barns and pubs along the canal were fortified. There are still some remaining concrete pillboxes and brick built blockhouses.

The Canal & it's History
Availability & Hire Charges
Canal Cruise Planner
Your Boat Accommodation
The Guest Book
Easy Narrow Boat Operation
Travel Directions / Options
How to Operate the Locks
Wildlife, Fishing & Walking
Back to the Home Page

Route Planner...so which way would you like to go?

Whether you wish to simply cruise to the nearest isolated country location of your choosing and moor up for a day or more of peace and quiet....to enjoy a good book, catch up on some creativity, revision or relaxation....the choice is yours.

However if you wish to explore some of the scenery and attractions of this wonderfull waterway....then please read on, or select one of the two options below.

Cruising West through the Pennines to East Lancashire

We recommend this route for those seeking a more active exploring Holiday

Setting out from Gargarve to Skipton (5 miles) we descend through two easy single step Locks and cruise through picturesque Dales scenery before descending finally Holme Bridge Lock. Here you can break your journey for a game of pitch and putt adjacent to the canal in Aireville Park or you can moor up beside the majestic canal side Herriots Hotel offering fine cuisine and real ales. A further 1/2 mile brings you to the Historic town of Skipton where you can visit Skipton Castle, Embsay steam railway or maybe a trip over the famous settle carlisle railway. Skipton has some excellent shops and of course the renowned Skipton Market. In the evening a selection of fine Pubs, Restaurants and Hotels may tempt you. Skipton is also the gateway to the dales from here you can take a short trips to Malham Cove, Grassington and Bolton Abbey (via the Embsay steam railway) to name but a few.

Climbing back aboard we head East in easy stages to Silsden (7 miles) there are no Locks to descend or ascend between Skipton and Silsden and after we pass the Bay Horse Pub the canal becomes more elevated against the Aire valley basin affording spectacular views of the valley. With just the occasional swing bridge briefly halting our journey the route is scenic and interesting. Soon we pass through leafy avenues and the picture postcard Dales villages of Bradley and Kildwick and there are wonderful views here to be savored. The final stretch to the West Yorkshire Town of Silsden is fairly straight and peaceful, here you can moor up beside the Charming Bridge Inn and explore this Historic Mill town. Silsden has all town facilties including a well stocked Co-op foodstore, many fine Pubsserving local ales and a number of Restaurants.

Climbing back aboard we head East to Keighley (4 miles) home of the famous Keighley and Worth Valley Railway made world famous by the film the railway children offering you a magical trip to Haworth and Bronte Land. Keighley has full town shopping facilities including supermarkets, many excellent restaurants, the Peter Black museum, Bronte Ales and the Keighley Leisure centre, with Swimming Pool, Gymnasium, Sauna and Steam Room.

There are plenty of mooring facilities in the outlying village of Riddlesden.

Climbing back aboard again we head East passing the canal side Marquis of Granby and Historic village of East Morton and Picturesque Micklethwaite en route to the famous Bingley 3 and 5 rise Locks, here the first offering of healthy exercise is available. The journey time descending these world famous fully staffed Locks can take up to 2 hours and offers good fun and some healthy exercise if desired. Bingley itself is very prosperous suburb town with all town facilities including, Supermarkets, Leisure centre, good restaurants and Pubs. From here you can take a short trip to Ilkley Moor to enjoy spectacular views of the aire valley and West Yorkshire.

Climbing back aboard again we head East to Saltaire (4 miles) passing through tree lined avenues we pass the delightful canal side Fishermans Inn and then descend Dowley Gap Locks which lead onto the spectacular Aqueduct which bridges you across the River Aire valley. The canal now passes through scenic woodland high above the River Aire before reaching Hirst Wood Locks. After Descending these Locks another steady 1/2 mile brings you to Saltaire the one time home of Sir Titus Salt and his unique world famous Model Village, Mill and world renowned 1853 David Hockney Gallery. These attractions are all well worth Mooring up to explore and enjoy. Saltaire also offers a general Store and a number of Quality Bars and Restaurants such as the Old Tramshed, The Boat House Bar, Fannys Ale House and The Sir Titus Salt bar. Please click here for more information on Bars and Restaurants in Saltaire.

Also from here a pleasant short walk through Roberts Park brings you to the Shipley Glen Tramway now over 100 years old. The tramway offers an exiting ride to the top of the Glen which affords lovely views of the Aire Valley and perhaps a walk through Shipley Glen or over Ilkley Moor?

Heading further East we arrive in the the suburb town of Shipley, the one time former Junction to the former canal branch to Bradford, part of this canal still exists as a mooring area. Here you can pick up provisions in Shipleys well stocked shops and supermarkets, or you can take a short train trip (3 miles) to the Historic wool town of Bradford.

There was originally a branch of the Leeds Liverpool canal from Shipley to Bradford. The former junction and part of the Branch still exists today as a marina facility. Some of the canals remains and overbridges can still be seen also.

Climbing back aboard we Head East toward Apperley Bridge (5 miles) the route is scenic and easy going with a small number of swing bridges, shortly we pass Esholt and a short walk from here brings you too the famous village, original home of Emmerdale Farm. The famous Woolpack Inn still dominates the village and Emmerdale merchandise can be purchased at the villages Post Office. Climbing aboard again we traverse a mixture of woodland and tree lined stretches before finally reaching Apperley Bridge, it's fantastic Marina facilities and the nearby Stansfield Arms Apperley Bridge again has most town facilities including a general store and number of other Pubs.

Cruising East again towards Leeds (5 miles) we plod on towards Kirkstall where you can stop off to visit the medieval Kirkstall Abbey and Museum constructed in 1152. The Abbey sits on the banks of the River Aire. Opposite the ruins of the Abbey three Victorian Streets have been recreated in the Old Abbey Gatehouse and are used to film the modern day TV series Emmerdale. For good food and drink the The Old Bridge Inn is close by, the Inn was originally reputed to have served as a mortuary for the monks at the Abbey. Finally we reach the major Northern cosmopolitan city of Leeds with fully equipped safe mooring facilities. Leeds offers the visitor everything from Fine Food, drink and Shopping to Harewood House, a day trip on the train to Historic York or cultured Harrogate. Alternatively you can simply visit The Royal Armouries on the banks of the Aire and Calder canal.

You can venture further East from Leeds

Through suburb towns like Woodlesford to Castleford. Here you can choose to head for the Humber Estuary, or you can traverse the circular Pennine ring via the Calder Hebble Pennine Ring. This route takes you back in industrial History through the mill towns of Dewsbury & Brighouse and the popular tourist towns of Sowerby Bridge, Hebden Bridge & Todmorden before reaching cosmopolitan Manchester. Here you can link back up with the Leeds Liverpool canal at Wigan to return back via East Lancashire and the Yorkshire dales.

However you will need as much as 3 weeks to cover either of these options

The Canal & it's History
Availability & Hire Charges
Canal Cruise Planner
Your Boat Accommodation
The Guest Book
Easy Narrow Boat Operation
Travel Directions / Options
How to Operate the Locks
Wildlife, Fishing & Walking
Back to the Home Page

Cruising West through the Pennines to East Lancashire

We recommend this route for those seeking a more peaceful scenic holiday

Before we head West perhaps you may be tempted to walk part of the Pennine way? Gargrave offers the opportunity for the walker to break off their cruise, stretch their legs and enjoy part of this famous walk to the breathtaking Malham Cove an easy going 12 mile round trip!

No you would rather head West! and enjoy some good regular exercise, cruising through dramatic pennine scenery and yesterdays Industrial Heritage. Having ascended Gargrave Twin Locks by the canal side Anchor Inn we cruise towards Barnoldswick (8 miles) through beautiful Dales scenery soon reaching the Bank Newton series of Locks. The initial Locks deceive us into believing they are the one and only set of Locks.

Having ascended these Locks we soon discover picturesque moorings and many more progresive Locks lifting us high above the Pennines.

Gargrave to Barnoldswick offers an endless choice countryside locations to park up and enjoy

From here we traverse the most incredible stretch of the canal, snaking around the contours and reverse curves, the distant views are spectacular. We can see where we are going to be in ten minutes time as it all appears to be just a stones throw away! As we follow the contours to the head of the valley, we finally negotiate a hairpin bend and return back on a parallel course, soon we pass under the amazing double bridges before finally arriving at East Marton, where you can stop at the excellent Cross Keys Inn

Moving on from East Marton we cruise through dramatic Pennine scenery gradually ascending through more single step Locks to Greenberfield the highest point of the Leeds Liverpool canal a massive 487ft / 149m above Sea level. Greenberfield Locks are voted the best kept set of Locks in the country and you can moor up here and enjoy a number of country walks and views. Climbing back aboard we soon reach visit Historic, picturesque Barnoldswick and for the keen walkers a chance to stretch their legs with a dramatic walk to the top of Pendle Hill (5 mile round trip) famous for it's witch craft....or for the less energetic the Barnoldswick Rolls Royce museum or some of the charming local Inns are far less strenuous in this welcoming East Lancashire village. Barnoldswick has full town facilities including CO-OP foodstore, Off Licence and many good Pubs selling local Ales.

Climbing back aboard again we head for Foulridge, it's excellent Marina and quaint village (6 miles) cruising through a pleasing series of curves and rolling Pennine countryside we arrive at Salterforth at the head of the Foulridge Tunnel a major construction achievement, best known for the story of a cow who once swam the whole length of the tunnel! This tunnel has no towpath and it is only possible to travel in one direction at a time, so traffic lights control a ten-minute window in each direction each hour. Because the tunnel is straight and well lit you see the amazing stalactites as the tunnel is 14ft wide.

Heading West again we cruise towards Burnley (10.5 miles) and apart from the amazing tunnel this section has another 7 locks over the 10.5 miles to Burnley. Having negotiated the Tunnel you can moor up and visit the famous 'Hole in the Wall where you can see the picture of the famous (infamous) cow that swam through Foulridge tunnel. Moving on from Foulridge we cruise through tranquil Lancashire countryside before reaching the most lovely Barrowford Locks. The small town of Barrowford is based much along one high street, with a Coop foodstore, Cafes, Restaurants, Takeaways and various other shops. Moving on from here we potter through Nelson and high above the rooftops of Burnley via The Burnley Embankment regarded as one of the Seven Wonders of Britain's waterways a most spectacular experience!

The wharf at Burnley has been beautifully renovated, and there is a museum worth visiting. The Inn on the Wharf provides good moorings right beside the entrance. The food here is top quality, beautifully presented, delicious and not too expensive. Burnley has full town facilities from Supermarkets and cashpoints to Leisure centres, and then visited

Climbing back aboard we cruise toward Blackburn (15 miles) you can speed along from here as this route has just 1 tunnel and zero locks! Having left Burnley we negotiate the Gannow Tunnel, cruise past Rose Grove and a number of swing bridges. The canal now negotiates exposed pennine hillside and the views are fantastic. At one point spectacularly crossing above the M65 motorway. Reaching Clayton-le-moors you can either moor up here or cruise the last few miles into Eanam Wharf Blackburn plentiful for good food and drink. Blackburn is a fine example of East Lancashire Historic Industrial Heritage and boasts some lovely old buildings and museums. Of particular interest is Blackburn Cathedral

Moving West from here we cruise from Blackburn to Johnson's Hill (8.5 miles) This journey involves 6 locks and at bridge 99 there is a good pub called The Moorings with exelent views. Heading West again we find ourselves cruising through quiet, pleasant open countryside up to Johnson Hill Lock, here you can moor up at the top of the locks and visit the very nice Top Lock pub, friendly and pleasant with good food served all evening.

Climbing back aboard we cruise from Johnson's Hill to Red Rock a journey of 8 miles and another 7 beautiful sets of locks, finally reaching Chorley and Botany Bay you can moor up and visit the Railway Inn a pleasant pub or you can travel round the back of Chorley to moor up at Red Rock to visit the exelent Crawford Arms

You can venture further than Chorley

The journey from Red Rock to Wigan is only 5 miles however their are 23 Locks so you will need to flex your muscles and exercise your patience before finally reaching the final flight of Locks to The beautiful Wigan Pier. The journey from Wigan offers a choice of Either West through delightful Lancashire towns like Appley Bridge, Parbold and Burscough Bridge on the route to Maritime Liverpool, or you can head south and traverse the circular Pennine ring via the Calder Pennine Ring, taking you back through industrial History and the mill towns of Dewsbury & Brighouse and the popular tourist towns of Sowerby Bridge, Hebden Bridge and & Todmorden before finally linking back up with the Leeds Liverpool canal at Castleford to return back via Leeds, Saltaire, Keighley and the Yorkshire dales

However you will need more as much as 3 weeks to cover either of these options

The Canal & it's History
Availability & Hire Charges
Canal Cruise Planner
Your Boat Accommodation
The Guest Book
Easy Narrow Boat Operation
Travel Directions / Options
How to Operate the Locks
Wildlife, Fishing & Walking
Back to the Home Page

Wildlife, Fishing & Walking

More and more anglers are flocking to our peaceful canals every year. By taking a Narrow Boat Holiday you acquire the right to Fish from your the deck of your Narrow Boat whenever and wherever so long as you purchase a Fishing Permit. The most Popular fish found in the Leeds Liverpool canal are Carp, Roach, Bream and Gudgeon, with some dace and chub in pockets. Many anglers are happy to catch large numbers of the smaller fish, but those who are selective in their methods and locations, seek out the bigger fish. Carp are widespread with fish up to 28lb and specimen eels lurk in many lengths of this waterway. Some of the remaining Un-navigable Clear but Weedy Branches and inlet rivers form havens for larger roach, rudd and tench often with good numbers of pike to provide sport for rod benders. For further detailed Canal Fishing information visit waterscape.com

You'll find all sorts of wildlife on Britain's waterways - from common sights such as Mallards, Moorhens and Swans, to Otters Water Voles For further detailed Canal Wildlife information visit waterscape.com

The Leeds & Liverpool canal crosses fantastic Pennine and Yorkshire Dales scenery, including gateways to the following popular walks. The Pennine way at Gargrave, Ilkley Moor from Saltaire or Bingley, The Worth Way and Bronte Land from Keighley and Pendle Hill from Barnoldswick to name but a few.

The Canal & it's History
Availability & Hire Charges
Canal Cruise Planner
Your Boat Accommodation
The Guest Book
Easy Narrow Boat Operation
Travel Directions / Options
How to Operate the Locks
Wildlife, Fishing & Walking
Back to the Home Page

Easy Narrow Boat Operation

How safe? will my Narrow boat holiday be? A full briefing and a detailed operation manual is supplied with every narrow boat hired. Buoyancy jackets are also provided free of charge and we always suggest you wear non-slip footwear. There is always a potential risk near water but if you act responsibly your narrow boat holiday should be safe.

What experience? do I need for a narrow boat holiday? No previous experience is necessary for a narrow boat holiday. Novices will be given whatever extra help and advice needed to ensure they are competent in the handling of the narrow boat.

When can we arrive? for our Narrow Boat Holiday and when must we drop the narrow boat off? The Boats are normally available from 3:00pm on the start date until 9:30am on the finish date.

Where can we go? on our narrow boat holiday and how far? This Narrow boat is licensed for the Leeds & Liverpool canal and the Pennine circular route via Manchester and Sowerby Bridge / or Huddersfield. With speeds of 4 mph you can cover approximately 100 miles in a week.

The Canal & it's History
Availability & Hire Charges
Canal Cruise Planner
Your Boat Accommodation
The Guest Book
Easy Narrow Boat Operation
Travel Directions / Options
How to Operate the Locks
Wildlife, Fishing & Walking
Back to the Home Page

Your Boat Accommodation

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New Build 57 foot Luxury Cruiser's with all modern facilities ranging from a fully fitted kitchen, Shower Room, Wood Burning Stove and full central heating to Flat Screen TV / DVD's in the living area and bedroom. Sleeping up to 4 people.

The Double bedroom has it's own dividing privacy door, central heating, ample hanging and storage space and flat screen TV / DVD. The purpose built dining suite converts to provide additional sleeping for the 3rd and 4th person in the Sitting room.

The Shower Room, consists of Electric Shower and Cubicle, WC and Wash Hand Basin. There is a towel rail and ample storage facility for further Towels, Shelves are provided for Toiletries

The Kitchen includes a Gas Oven and Hob, Fridge with ice box, Microwave Oven, Kettle. All Crockery, Glassware, Pots, Pans, Cookware, Cutlery and even a cork screw are provided for your convenience.

The open plan Sitting / Dining Room offers all modern comforts, including full central heating with a most welcoming Wood / Coal Stove. There is a TV / DVD, Luxury relaxing Chaise Sofa & Chair. Plus dual purpose Dining suite for 4 people, which converts into an additional double bed.

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Additional outdoor furniture, Folding deck chairs and Camp Table are provided for responsible use on the Aft Deck and canal side picnics and lounging.

This boat has 240 volts for the Microwave, TV / DVD, Hairdryer ect.

Fully Inclusive

All hire charges include all "Full Boat Handling Instruction, Full Lockside Instruction, all the cruising equipment, Gas, Diesel, Buoyancy Aids, Bedding and Towels "

The Canal & it's History
Availability & Hire Charges
Canal Cruise Planner
Your Boat Accommodation
The Guest Book
Easy Narrow Boat Operation
Travel Directions / Options
How to Operate the Locks
Wildlife, Fishing & Walking
Back to the Home Page

Availability & Hire

Low Season Cruising Breaks

from just 423

Highest Season 4 night Cruising Breaks just £764

 

Weekly rental includes "Full practical Boat Handling Instruction, Full practical Lockside Instruction, all the cruising equipment, Gas, Diesel, Buoyancy Aids, Bedding and Towels

Or for further information please complete this short form

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